Tag Archives: toby jones

London Critics’ Circle Award Winners

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It’s an Amour love-in for the London Critics’ Circle. And the rest of the winners are rather lovely, too, even if the acting wins are for the most part on a par with what we’ve already seen during this year’s Oscar Race.

But London felt it was right to applaud Rust And Bone, The Imposter and Berberian Sound Studio which the Oscar nominations left out completely, with recognition also going to the wonderful Andrea Riseborough.

With a couple of other well-deserved wins for British talent, check out the full list of winners below: Continue reading

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2012 British Independent Film Award Winners

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Just when it looked like Berberian Sound Studio and all involved might sweep the boards at the BIFAs, Rufus Norris’ directorial debut, Broken, messed it all up by winning the prize for Best British Independent Film. It also prevented Domhnall Gleeson from picking up Best Supporting Actor for Shadow Dancer – but my mad love for the Irish actor won’t stop me admitting how irritatingly talented Rory Kinnear is.

Talking of mad love, Olivia Colman walked away with her head held high for the second year running with a win for her portrayal of the Queen Mother in Hyde Park On Hudson. Will BAFTA actually take note this year? Who knows.

The Imposter – Oscar-shortlisted, don’t you know – took home Best Debut Director alongside its Best Documentary win. Can’t have them all, Rufus.

Check out the full list of winners below: Continue reading

2012 British Independent Film Award Nominations

Never one to go with the obvious choices, BIFA’s 15th awards ceremony plays host to a set of nominations which once again prove the power of the documentary.

Although not as initially exciting as last year’s list, BIFA continue their mad love for Vanessa Redgrave and Olivia Colman while giving Robbie Ryan and Domnhall Gleeson recognition for their continued blistering form.

Rufus Norris’ Broken sets the bar with an impressive nine nominations including Best Film, Best Director and a bunch of acting nods, with Ben Wheatley’s Sightseers and Peter Strickland’s Berberian Sound Studio picking up seven.

I’m thrilled to see The Imposter deservedly crossing over from the Best Documentary category, with Bart Layton’s film earning six nominations including Best Director. As I mentioned yesterday, it’s not going to be a quiet season for him.

Though those pesky Americans may manage to pop up in the form of Meryl Streep and Elle Fanning, for those who prefer it quintessentially British (albeit set in India…), there’s no need to fear – The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel has earned itself a trio of acting nominations.

The winners will be announced for the seventh time by BIFA Patron, James Nesbitt, on December 9th at the Old Billingsgate in London. So, as ever, check out the full list of nominees below: Continue reading

Bitesize Review: Snow White And The Huntsman (2012)

DIRECTOR: Rupert Sanders.

CAST: Kristen Stewart, Charlize Theron, Chris Hemsworth, Sam Spruell, Sam Claflin, Nick Frost, Brian Gleeson, Johnny Harris, Bob Hoskins, Toby Jones, Eddie Marsan, Ian McShane, Ray Winstone, Vincent Regan, Rachael Stirling, Noah Huntley.

SYNOPSIS: A twist on the fairytale we all know, when Queen Ravenna (Theron) sends a Huntsman (Hemsworth) to kill Snow White (Stewart), he finds himself incapable of murder and joins forces with her to end the Queen’s tyranny.

My broken arm calls for a slightly different (and bitesize) reviewing format. So here’s ten things I want to say about Snow White And The Huntsman: Continue reading

Review: Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (2011)

DIRECTOR: Tomas Alfredson.

CAST: Gary Oldman, Benedict Cumberbatch, Tom Hardy, Colin Firth, Mark Strong, David Dencik, Toby Jones, John Hurt, Ciaran Hinds, Svetlana Khodchenkova, Stephen Graham, Kathy Burke, Roger Lloyd-Pack, Simon McBurney, Philip Martin Brown.

SYNOPSIS: After a covert mission goes horribly wrong, George Smiley (Oldman) and his superior, British Intelligence spymaster Control (Hurt) are let go from their jobs. But when Ricki Tarr (Hardy) turns up claiming to have evidence that there is a Soviet mole at the heart of British Intelligence, Smiley and colleague Peter Guillam (Cumberbatch) are enlisted to pin down the traitor.

Beautifully constructed and meticulously executed, Tomas Alfredson’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is a showcase in pitch perfect pacing, acting and storytelling. Centred around a series of flashbacks utilised as a way in which to pin down the mole at the top of the circus, the race to find the culprit is as sadistically frustrating as it is chokingly tense. Continue reading

Review: Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

DIRECTOR: Joe Johnston.

CAST: Chris Evans, Hayley Atwell, Sebastian Stan, Tommy Lee Jones, Hugo Weaving, Dominic Cooper, Stanley Tucci, Toby Jones, Richard Armitage, Neal McDonough, Derek Luke, Kenneth Choi, JJ Feild, Lex Shrapnel, Samuel L. Jackson.

SYNOPSIS: With World War II forcing America into action, Steve Rogers (Evans) is desperate to be drafted for military service. Sickly and rather on the small side, he receives knock back after knock back until his path crosses Dr. Erskine (Tucci) who is recruiting for the very hushed Project Rebirth. Being accepted due to his incredible courage, his body is enhanced to its maximum potential and Captain America is born. However, Johann Schmidt (Weaving) has plans to use the same technology to progress the Nazi’s secret organisation, HYDRA.

Holy smokes. Joe Johnston’s made something that’s more than just a ‘good’ film. In fact, he’s made a bloody great film that can easily boast of standing alongside Marvel’s best. Captain America is one of those rare comic book adaptations that has more on offer than just a glossy surface. It lacks an overly camp villain, manages to avoid glaringly cheesy one-liners from its star and has a female love interest who has more than a couple of brain cells (and who earns extra brownie points for being a Brit). The ending is one that will more than satisfy the Marvel diehards, but will undoubtedly confuse the hell out of those who have merely popped along to see that-film-that’s-going-to-shove-American-patriotism-down-my-throat – which it surprisingly doesn’t, actually. Of course, you’re not a real Marvel fan unless you stay until the end of the credits and this time the payoff is unbelievably sweet. Continue reading