Tag Archives: tate taylor

The 64th Writers Guild Of America Awards – Winners

Well this is interesting. The main point here is that under the WGA’s rules, The Artist was not eligible to be nominated, resulting in far less competition for the Best Original Screenplay win. But come Sunday – and with the lack of love for Midnight In Paris in regards to the Best Picture race – it’s hard not to see the Academy getting swept up in the magic of Hazanavicius’ film and award it over Allen (who should win). The Best Adapted winner, The Descendants, is hardly worth mentioning as I don’t see Hugo or Moneyball taking its crown, and as for the winner of Best Documentary Screenplay, the WGA chose Better This World, a film not even nominated by the Academy. Oh, and did I mention that the DGA and PGA also awarded documentaries that Oscar didn’t care to nominate? Check out the WGA winners below: Continue reading

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Review: The Help (2011)

DIRECTOR: Tate Taylor.

CAST: Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, Bryce Dallas Howard, Jessica Chastain, Ahna O’Reilly, Allison Janney, Anna Camp, Eleanor and Emma Henry, Chris Lowell, Cicely Tyson, Mike Vogel, Aunjanue Ellis, Sissy Spacek, Ted Welch, Leslie Jordan, Mary Steenburgen.

SYNOPSIS: Set in Mississippi during the 1960s, Eugenia ‘Skeeter’ Phelan (Stone) is less concerned about finding a husband than her friends, desperate to become a respected writer. Troubled by the way the black women who work in her friends’ homes are treated, Skeeter turns to Aibileen Clark (Davis), asking her to disclose the truth about what really goes on behind closed doors. With others reluctant to help at first, Skeeter finds herself on the road to discovering some of the community’s best-guarded secrets and exposing the town during the civil rights movement.

Set amidst the events of the civil rights movement, for all its laughs and light heartedness, The Help deals with some incredibly traumatising events – albeit in a 12A fashion. This is bled into the second half with great ease and is a very impressive transition from the fun, caricatured portrayal of American society from the first half. Although we don’t see any mass violence, we see people escaping it, running for their lives and sporadic mentions of Jim Crow and similar figures ensure the harsh reality remains an ominous shadow over the film. Continue reading