Tag Archives: seth rogen

What I’m Watching – July 2013

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry.

Fire With Fire (Dir: David Barrett, 2012) **

Mr. Popper’s Penguins (Dir: Mark Waters, 2011) ***

Water For Elephants (Dir: Francis Lawrence, 2011) **

The Wolverine (Dir: James Mangold, 2013) ***

Pacific Rim (Dir: Guillermo del Toro, 2013) ***

This Is The End (Dir: Evan Goldberg, Seth Rogen, 2013) ****

The East (Dir: Zal Batmanglij, 2013) ****

Now You See Me (Dir: Louis Leterrier, 2013) ***

The World’s End (Dir: Edgar Wright, 2013) ****

A Field In England (Dir: Ben Wheatley, 2013) ****

Kaboom (Dir: Greg Araki, 2010) **

The Soloist (Dir: Joe Wright, 2009) ***

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Trailer Talk: Spidey Rebooted, Wheelchair Dancing, Doctor Who And The Apocalypse

Yes, yes, yes, I apologise again for my laptop not loving me. As I posted a while back, it gave up on me, so I haven’t been able to post anything! So I’m sorry they’re so late, but I wanted to put them up anyway! So, soldiers, spiders, Jeremy Renner, Doctor Who, crazy Nazis, wheelchairs, Osama Bin Laden and the apocalypse – let’s talk trailers. Continue reading

Ten (Well, Twelve) Things I Would Like To Say To BAFTA

#1 – I’m proud of you for nominating Drive for Best Film and Best Director. ACADEMY TAKE NOTE.

 

 

 

 

 

#2 – Why did you put Mulligan on the longlist for Best Actress for Shame? She quite obviously should have been nominated for her work in that as opposed to Drive in the Best Supporting category.

#3 – Your Outstanding British Film category is a bit of a shambles, to be honest. Where’s the likes of Tyrannosaur, Submarine, The Guard or Weekend? They were all considerably more ‘Outstanding’ than My Week With Marilyn. But at least you didn’t nominate The Iron Lady.

#4 – Would it have been too much to ask for some love for 50/50?

 

 

 

#5 – TINTIN IS NOT ANIMATED!!!! I’ve lost complete sense of where the lines blur in this category, now, to be honest….

 

#6 – Bejo should not be up for Best Actress. You should have put her nicely in the Best Supporting category instead of Dame Judi and given some room for the thoroughly deserving Olivia Colman.

 

 

 

#7 – What makes you think you’re cool enough to buck the Brooks trend?

 

 

 

 

 

#8 – While we’re in the Supporting categories, you seem to think McCarthy will be Oscar nominated for Bridesmaids. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry.

 

#9 – This year’s soundtrack category has been an interesting one and the choices here are pretty stellar, but being BAFTA, you could have thrown some love Hanna or Attack The Block’s way. And yet again, what about continuing that love for Drive?

 

#10 – Broadbent and Dench. Yes, I appreciate they’re national treasures and I love them dearly. But there were far better choices that got left out because of their respective nominations.

 

 

#11 – I’m still confused over the people left out of this Rising Star category…

 

 

 

 

#12 – YOU DIDN’T VOTE THE TREE OF LIFE FOR ANYTHING?! NOT EVEN CINEMATOGRAPHY?!! We’re going to fall out, BAFTA.

Anyway, see below for the full list of nominees: Continue reading

Review: 50/50 (2011)

DIRECTOR: Jonathan Levine.

CAST: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Seth Rogen, Anna Kendrick, Bryce Dallas Howard, Angelica Huston, Philip Baker Hall, Matt Frewer, Serge Houde, Andrew Airlie.

SYNOPSIS: Based on a true story, when 27 year-old Adam (Gordon-Levitt), a clean living radio employee, is diagnosed with a rare form of spinal cancer, his whole world starts to slowly crumble around him. Best friend Kyle (Rogen) wants to preserve his quality of life by keeping him partying, whilst his mother, Diane (Huston), wants to move in with him and girlfriend Rachael (Howard) to take control.

Although it’s a film about cancer, you shouldn’t walk into 50/50 expecting over dramatics. You also shouldn’t expect a laugh a minute, gross-out comedy simply due to Seth Rogen’s presence. What you should expect is a mixture of the two, sensitively handled by director Levine, ensuring Will Reiser’s script is handled with care to deliver a film that carries great moral value and a hell of a lot of substance. And most of this is solely down to Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Continue reading