Tag Archives: palme d’or

2012 European Film Award Winners

Screen Shot 2012-12-05 at 06.01.12

So the Palme d’Or paid off, then, Haneke.

While Amour took home four of the main prizes at the European Film Awards, Shame and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy also managed to walk away with two. It’s pretty much completely Haneke’s party, but if you want to attempt to find the other winners amongst his rather triumphant night, check out the select few below: Continue reading

2012 European Film Award Nominations

Marion Cotillard, where art thou?

Michael Haneke’s Amour, Steve McQueen’s Shame and Tomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt lead the pack for the 25th Annual European Film Awards.

With Amour winning Haneke the Palme d’Or in Cannes earlier this year, his chance at a spot in Oscar’s Best Picture category is looking rather positive. But even with its prime November UK and December US release dates, with two months to go, we all know that anything could happen.

As a huge fan of Untouchable, its strong presence here is great to see (that’s the Weinstein effect for you), but I definitely wasn’t expecting Kate Winslet to pop up or to find The Angels’ Share score in the mix. Brilliant film, but completely unmemorable music – aside from The Proclaimers, of course.

Oh, and if you were wondering, Holy Motors wasn’t eligible.

Check out the full list of nominees below: Continue reading

65th Cannes Film Festival Winners

The winners of the 2012 Cannes Film Festival have just been announced by Nanni Moretti’s jury, with Michael Haneke taking his second Palme d’Or for Festival favourite, Amour.

To see who won the remaining eight Awards, check the winners out below, including a win for one of my most anticipated films, Beasts Of The Southern Wild and two actresses sharing their prize. Continue reading

Review: The Tree of Life (2011)

DIRECTOR: Terrence Malick.

CAST: Brad Pitt, Hunter McCracken, Jessica Chastain, Laramie Eppler, Sean Penn, Tye Sheridan, Fiona Shaw.

SYNOPSIS: Jack O’Brien (McCracken) and his two brothers (Eppler, Sheridan) grow up in the 1960s, spending their days carefree and full of play. We witness firsthand the loss of innocence through Jack’s eyes as he experiences his first brushes with death and suffering. The world is no longer as perfect as he believed and his family struggle with his quick progression into adolescence. Running parallel to this, an older Jack (Penn) tries to atone and understand past events in his life, working towards being able to forgive his father (Pitt).

To say The Tree of Life is grandiose is a complete understatement. It is beautiful, indulgent, heartfelt and extremely honest. And I truly believe it to be a masterpiece. Clichés aside, Terrence Malick’s Palme d’Or-winning film has been rather controversial, being booed at Cannes and five people walked out when I saw it. But I believe this to be a sign of a great filmmaker, somebody who divides opinion and stems controversial discussion. At the end of the day, this isn’t going to be a film people forget.
Continue reading