Tag Archives: october

What I’m Watching – October 2013

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry.

Thor: The Dark World (Dir: Alan Taylor, 2013) ***

King Of Devil’s Island (Kongen av Bastøy) (Dir: Marius Holst, 2010) ****

Adam’s Apples (Adams æbler) (Dir: Anders Thomas Jensen, 2005) ***

Captain Phillips (Dir: Paul Greengrass, 2013) *****

Filth (Dir: Jon S. Baird, 2013) ****

The Fifth Estate (Dir: Bill Condon, 2013) ***

Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2 (Dir: Cody Cameron, Kris Pearn, 2013) ***

The Paperboy (Dir: Lee Daniels, 2012) ****

Rush (Dir: Ron Howard, 2013) *****

Blue Jasmine (Dir: Woody Allen, 2013) *****

Prisoners (Dir: Dennia Villeneuve, 2013) ****

How I Live Now (Dir: Kevin Macdonald, 2013) ***

Seeking A Friend For The End Of The World (Dir: Lorene Scafaria, 2012) ***

Review: Beasts Of The Southern Wild (2012)

DIRECTOR: Benh Zeitlin.

CAST: Quvenzhane Wallis, Dwight Henry, Gina Montana, Levy Easterly, Lowell Landes, Pamela Harper, Joseph Brown, Philip Lawrence.

SYNOPSIS: Hushpuppy (Wallis) and her father, Wink (Henry), live in a ramshackle area of Louisiana known as the Bathtub. Life is full of reverie and the tightknit community hunt for their food all day and party all night. But when a great storm threatens to ruin everything they have, six year-old Hushpuppy and her father face an adventure bigger than they could ever have imagined.

It’s a rare thing to find a film that moves the ground beneath you and shakes you to your core, but Benh Zeitlin’s first feature-length film does just that, investigating the boundaries of primal family life in the back end of Louisiana, while releasing delicately handled political and environmental ripples across the waters of the Bathtub. Continue reading

Casting Society Of America Award Winners

Are we able to stop talking about The Artist now…? I think so.

Celebrating a category that is deemed unfit for Oscar – a rather shocking oversight, in my opinion – there isn’t a great deal to be surprised by, but some 2012 releases did make the list of nominations, which you can find here.

Ben Affleck received a Career Achievement Award and his Argo casting director, Lora Kennedy, was honoured with The Hoyt Bowers Award For Excellence In Casting. And we all know she’ll be back on that list of nominees for next year.

Check out the full list of winners below: Continue reading

Because There’s Talent In The Bathtub

Absolute perfection.

Well Now These Are Just Brilliant

Kanye West meets Wes Anderson.

Who’d have thunk it?

Head over to Kanye Wes for the rest.

Hello, I’m Back (AKA A Quick Awards Season Catch Up)

Right. Let’s get back to business.

With Awards Season itching to accelerate into full gear, my acquisition of a new laptop (yes, that’s right, I have been without one since Edinburgh…) comes at just the right time.

What have I kept you in the dark over, you cry? Well, not a lot to be honest, apart from the burning question of which of the powerhouse American trifecta made up of MacFarlane, Fey and Poehler will manage to fit Shot Scorsese into their presenting duties. Oh, and Beasts Of The Southern Wild is ineligible for the SAG Awards because the little bundle of joy that is Quvenzhane Wallis isn’t a ‘professional actor’, which definitely sucks.

So, to wrap up and bring you the start of what will be a very post-heavy Awards Season, here’s the 2012 Gotham Independent Film Award nominees, BFI London Film Festival winners and the International Documentary Association Award nominees: Continue reading

What I’m Watching – October 2012

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry:

Down Terrace (Dir: Ben Wheatley, 2009) ****

Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (Dir: Quentin Tarantino, 2004) ****

Beasts Of The Southern Wild (Dir: Benh Zeitlin, 2012) *****

Skyfall (Dir: Sam Mendes, 2012) *****

The Campaign (Dir: Jay Roach, 2012) **

Sidney White (Dir: Joe Nussbaum, 2007) *

Ruby Sparks (Dir: Jonathan Dayton, Valerie Faris, 2012) ****

The Perks Of Being A Wallflower (Dir: Stephen Chbosky, 2012) ****

She’s The Man (Dir: Andy Fickman, 2006) ***

The Age Of Innocence (Dir: Martin Scorsese, 1993) ***

Review: Anonymous (2011)

As this video will explain, the format for my next couple of reviews is going to change. I think it’s safe to say they’re now in ramble form, as what I’m talking about here is all off the top of my head. But, hey, sometimes it’s nice to have a bit of a change. Feedback (as always) will be warmly welcome.

Continue reading

The 2011 BIFA Nominations

And so here starts Awards season.

Admit it, we all felt it looming. From the minute Tinker Tailor came out complete with best of British, we were all secretly wondering who’d be up for the big ones come January 2012. Who would be the one chosen for Best Supporting – Hardy or Cumberbatch? Or neither? Would Gary Oldman finally get his horrifically overdue nomination? But many of us have been quietly making our Academy Award predictions for months now. For those that saw Drive back in August, what of Albert Brooks? That same month, Warrior gave us a possibility in the form of Nick Nolte. And now with trailers for War Horse, Extremely Loud And Incredibly Close, The Descendants, J. Edgar, My Week With Marilyn, Coriolanus and Albert Nobbs etc, etc, etc, coming in thick and fast, I’d be lying if I said I didn’t feel a little giddy with excitement – and the potential bragging rights that come with guessing the most winners correctly. Continue reading

Review: The Help (2011)

DIRECTOR: Tate Taylor.

CAST: Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, Bryce Dallas Howard, Jessica Chastain, Ahna O’Reilly, Allison Janney, Anna Camp, Eleanor and Emma Henry, Chris Lowell, Cicely Tyson, Mike Vogel, Aunjanue Ellis, Sissy Spacek, Ted Welch, Leslie Jordan, Mary Steenburgen.

SYNOPSIS: Set in Mississippi during the 1960s, Eugenia ‘Skeeter’ Phelan (Stone) is less concerned about finding a husband than her friends, desperate to become a respected writer. Troubled by the way the black women who work in her friends’ homes are treated, Skeeter turns to Aibileen Clark (Davis), asking her to disclose the truth about what really goes on behind closed doors. With others reluctant to help at first, Skeeter finds herself on the road to discovering some of the community’s best-guarded secrets and exposing the town during the civil rights movement.

Set amidst the events of the civil rights movement, for all its laughs and light heartedness, The Help deals with some incredibly traumatising events – albeit in a 12A fashion. This is bled into the second half with great ease and is a very impressive transition from the fun, caricatured portrayal of American society from the first half. Although we don’t see any mass violence, we see people escaping it, running for their lives and sporadic mentions of Jim Crow and similar figures ensure the harsh reality remains an ominous shadow over the film. Continue reading