Tag Archives: mads mikkelsen

2012 European Film Award Nominations

Marion Cotillard, where art thou?

Michael Haneke’s Amour, Steve McQueen’s Shame and Tomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt lead the pack for the 25th Annual European Film Awards.

With Amour winning Haneke the Palme d’Or in Cannes earlier this year, his chance at a spot in Oscar’s Best Picture category is looking rather positive. But even with its prime November UK and December US release dates, with two months to go, we all know that anything could happen.

As a huge fan of Untouchable, its strong presence here is great to see (that’s the Weinstein effect for you), but I definitely wasn’t expecting Kate Winslet to pop up or to find The Angels’ Share score in the mix. Brilliant film, but completely unmemorable music – aside from The Proclaimers, of course.

Oh, and if you were wondering, Holy Motors wasn’t eligible.

Check out the full list of nominees below: Continue reading

Advertisements

65th Cannes Film Festival Winners

The winners of the 2012 Cannes Film Festival have just been announced by Nanni Moretti’s jury, with Michael Haneke taking his second Palme d’Or for Festival favourite, Amour.

To see who won the remaining eight Awards, check the winners out below, including a win for one of my most anticipated films, Beasts Of The Southern Wild and two actresses sharing their prize. Continue reading

Review: The Three Musketeers (2011)

DIRECTOR: Paul W.S. Anderson.

CAST: Logan Lerman, Matthew Macfadyen, Milla Jovovich, Orlando Bloom, Freddie Fox, Ray Stevenson, Luke Evans, Christoph Waltz, Juno Temple, Gabriella Wilde, Mads Mikkelsen, James Corden.

SYNOPSIS: After leaving the home he shares with his parents, D’Artagnan (Lerman) heads to Paris and meets the former Musketeers, Athos (Macfadyen), Porthos (Stevenson) and Aramis (Evans). Far removed from their former glory, they are all too soon swept up in a plot to seize the French throne and D’Artagnan must help them secure King Louis’ (Fox) position within Europe.

Paul W.S. Anderson’s The Three Musketeers has its heart in the right place. It’s a real shame, then, that so many extraordinarily talented actors are wasted to assure this is a vehicle for Logan Lerman. As much as you try and embrace the whole silliness of it, not a lot seems to work. And how did a film of 110 minutes feel so long? Continue reading