Tag Archives: july

What I’m Watching – July 2013

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry.

Fire With Fire (Dir: David Barrett, 2012) **

Mr. Popper’s Penguins (Dir: Mark Waters, 2011) ***

Water For Elephants (Dir: Francis Lawrence, 2011) **

The Wolverine (Dir: James Mangold, 2013) ***

Pacific Rim (Dir: Guillermo del Toro, 2013) ***

This Is The End (Dir: Evan Goldberg, Seth Rogen, 2013) ****

The East (Dir: Zal Batmanglij, 2013) ****

Now You See Me (Dir: Louis Leterrier, 2013) ***

The World’s End (Dir: Edgar Wright, 2013) ****

A Field In England (Dir: Ben Wheatley, 2013) ****

Kaboom (Dir: Greg Araki, 2010) **

The Soloist (Dir: Joe Wright, 2009) ***

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Interview: Phil Lord And Chris Miller Talk 21 Jump Street And The Lego Movie As ‘Inception For Kids’ – HeyUGuys

To celebrate the release of 21 Jump Street on DVD and Blu-ray, I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to speak to the directors, Phil Lord and Chris Miller, about the film and their upcoming projects.

Touching on everything from Channing Tatum’s love for improvising stunts to Tom Selleck’s moustache, it’s fair to say our interview covered rather a lot of ground! Every inch as charming and entertaining as you’d expect, the pair gave a brilliant insight into the funniest film of the year.

Please check out my interview here.

DVD Review: 21 Jump Street – HeyUGuys

21 Jump Street was released on DVD and Blu-ray in the UK yesterday. To check out my review for HeyUGuys, please click here.

Edinburgh International Film Festival 2012 Coverage

With an arm that was just out of a cast and a laptop that decided to give up on me a little too far before the halfway mark for comfort, the 66th Edinburgh International Film Festival may have had a few too many hiccups along the way in regards to my coverage, but the Festival itself was a resounding success. And, when the news was announced yesterday that Artistic Director Chris Fujiwara has committed his services for a further three years, there was not a bad word to be said.

With the return of the Michael Powell and International Awards and two big Red Carpet Galas in the form of William Friedkin’s Killer Joe and Disney Pixar’s Brave, Fujiwara has set himself an incredibly high bar, but one that he is surely ready (and more than able) to contend with. After all, there is a reason he’s referred to as The Mighty Fujiwara.

To check out what coverage was salvageable from my now wreck of a Mac, including interviews from the Brave Red Carpet, just click here.

What I’m Watching – July 2012

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry:

Ted (Dir: Seth MacFarlane, 2012) ***

The Karate Kid (Dir: Harald Zwart, 2010) ***

From Paris With Love (Dir: Pierre Morel, 2010) **

This Means War (Dir: McG, 2012) ***

The Dark Knight Rises (Dir: Christopher Nolan, 2012)

Gangs Of New York (Dir: Martin Scorsese, 2002) ****

Magic Mike (Dir: Steven Soderbergh, 2012) ****

The Five-Year Engagement (Dir: Nicholas Stoller, 2012) ***

Friends With Kids (Dir: Jennifer Westfeldt 2011) ***

Katy Perry: Part Of Me (Dir: Dan Cutforth, Jane Lipsitz, 2012) ***

The Amazing Spider-Man (Dir: Marc Webb, 2012) ***

Insomnia (Dir: Christopher Nolan, 2002) ***

Review: Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

DIRECTOR: Joe Johnston.

CAST: Chris Evans, Hayley Atwell, Sebastian Stan, Tommy Lee Jones, Hugo Weaving, Dominic Cooper, Stanley Tucci, Toby Jones, Richard Armitage, Neal McDonough, Derek Luke, Kenneth Choi, JJ Feild, Lex Shrapnel, Samuel L. Jackson.

SYNOPSIS: With World War II forcing America into action, Steve Rogers (Evans) is desperate to be drafted for military service. Sickly and rather on the small side, he receives knock back after knock back until his path crosses Dr. Erskine (Tucci) who is recruiting for the very hushed Project Rebirth. Being accepted due to his incredible courage, his body is enhanced to its maximum potential and Captain America is born. However, Johann Schmidt (Weaving) has plans to use the same technology to progress the Nazi’s secret organisation, HYDRA.

Holy smokes. Joe Johnston’s made something that’s more than just a ‘good’ film. In fact, he’s made a bloody great film that can easily boast of standing alongside Marvel’s best. Captain America is one of those rare comic book adaptations that has more on offer than just a glossy surface. It lacks an overly camp villain, manages to avoid glaringly cheesy one-liners from its star and has a female love interest who has more than a couple of brain cells (and who earns extra brownie points for being a Brit). The ending is one that will more than satisfy the Marvel diehards, but will undoubtedly confuse the hell out of those who have merely popped along to see that-film-that’s-going-to-shove-American-patriotism-down-my-throat – which it surprisingly doesn’t, actually. Of course, you’re not a real Marvel fan unless you stay until the end of the credits and this time the payoff is unbelievably sweet. Continue reading

Review: Horrible Bosses (2011)

DIRECTOR: Seth Gordon.

CAST: Jason Bateman, Charlie Day, Jason Sudeikis, Kevin Spacey, Jennifer Aniston, Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx, Donald Sutherland, Lindsay Sloane, Julie Bowen, P.J. Byrne, Celia Finkelstein, Ioan Gruffudd.

SYNOPSIS: Nick (Bateman) hates his boss for making him work sunrise to sunset with no reward. Kurt (Sudeikis) hates his boss for being a coked-out idiot who has no interest in the company aside from the financial reward. Dale (Day) hates his boss for being a borderline rapist when he’s about to get married. A drunken conversation between the three of them leads to the hiring of a hit man (Foxx) to ensure an easy working environment. But things are never that straightforward.

Horrible Bosses is undoubtedly a massive step forward for director Seth Gordon, with his previous work on American TV shows The Office, Modern Family and Parks and Recreation showcasing his effortless capability of working with the current Hollywood darlings usually favoured by a certain Judd Apatow. Although the first half of the film may feel like a rehearsal to the better-paced and more enjoyable second half, this film is far from predictable with a wonderfully natural chemistry between the three male leads. Continue reading