Tag Archives: august

What I’m Watching – August 2012

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry:

Now Is Good (Dir: Ol Parker, 2012) **

Untouchable (Intouchables) (Dir: Olivier Nakache, Eric Toledano, 2011) *****

Happy, Happy (Sykt Lykkelig) (Dir: Anne Sewitsky, 2010) ****

Detention (Dir: Joseph Kahn, 2011) ***

The Sound Of My Voice (Dir: Zal Batmanglij, 2011) ****

Flashbacks Of A Fool (Dir: Baillie Walsh, 2008) **

The Loved Ones (Dir: Sean Byrne, 2009) ***

Romeos (Dir: Sabine Bernardi, 2011) ****

Hysteria (Dir: Tanya Wexler, 2011) ***

On The Road (Dir: Walter Salles, 2012) **

Tabu (Dir: Miguel Gomes, 2012) *****

Circumstance (Dir: Maryam Keshavarz, 2011) ****

Samsara (Dir: Ron Fricke, 2011) *****

Love Crime (Crime D’Amour) (Dir: Alain Corneau, 2010) **

Page Eight (Dir: David Hare, 2011) ***

Damsels In Distress (Dir: Whit Stillman, 2011) ****

Predator (Dir: John McTiernan, 1987) ***

The Bourne Legacy (Dir: Tony Gilroy, 2012) ***

Brave (Dir: Mark Andrews, Brenda Chapman, 2012) ****

Taken (Dir: Pierre Morel, 2008) ***

Review: The Help (2011)

DIRECTOR: Tate Taylor.

CAST: Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, Bryce Dallas Howard, Jessica Chastain, Ahna O’Reilly, Allison Janney, Anna Camp, Eleanor and Emma Henry, Chris Lowell, Cicely Tyson, Mike Vogel, Aunjanue Ellis, Sissy Spacek, Ted Welch, Leslie Jordan, Mary Steenburgen.

SYNOPSIS: Set in Mississippi during the 1960s, Eugenia ‘Skeeter’ Phelan (Stone) is less concerned about finding a husband than her friends, desperate to become a respected writer. Troubled by the way the black women who work in her friends’ homes are treated, Skeeter turns to Aibileen Clark (Davis), asking her to disclose the truth about what really goes on behind closed doors. With others reluctant to help at first, Skeeter finds herself on the road to discovering some of the community’s best-guarded secrets and exposing the town during the civil rights movement.

Set amidst the events of the civil rights movement, for all its laughs and light heartedness, The Help deals with some incredibly traumatising events – albeit in a 12A fashion. This is bled into the second half with great ease and is a very impressive transition from the fun, caricatured portrayal of American society from the first half. Although we don’t see any mass violence, we see people escaping it, running for their lives and sporadic mentions of Jim Crow and similar figures ensure the harsh reality remains an ominous shadow over the film. Continue reading

Review: One Day (2011)

DIRECTOR: Lone Scherfig.

CAST: Anne Hathaway, Jim Sturgess, Rafe Spall, Romola Garai, Ken Stott, Patricia Clarkson, Tom Mison, Jodie Whittaker, Georgia King, Matt Berry.

SYNOPSIS: Emma (Hathaway) and Dexter (Sturgess) spend the night together after graduating from University. However, there is more talking and cuddling than actual funny business, so they agree to just be friends. We view glimpses of where they are on the same date each year – sometimes together, sometimes not.

First thing’s first. Anne Hathaway’s accent is nowhere near as abysmal as the masses are proclaiming. Granted, you have to fight hard to find the great Northern nuggets within her dialogue, but at least she doesn’t lapse into American. Let’s just say it’s as if she’s spent her life flitting between most of the counties within the UK. At her best when torn between the man she lives with and the man she loves, Hathaway shows real moments of fragility and confusion as Emma, as we track her from graduate to homeowner and beyond. However, it is Jim Sturgess as her best friend Dexter who has the edge in One Day. Continue reading

Review: Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes (2011)

DIRECTOR: Rupert Wyatt.

CAST: Andy Serkis, James Franco, John Lithgow, Freida Pinto, Brian Cox, David Oyelowo, Tom Felton, Tyler Labine, David Hewlett, Jamie Harris.

SYNOPSIS: Desperate to find a cure for Alzheimer’s, Will Rodman (Franco) takes home a baby chimpanzee to aid his research. While safe for Will and his father Charles (Lithgow) to live with, after an encounter with a neighbour goes horribly wrong, Caesar is taken away and impounded in terrible conditions. But having shown incredible near-human intelligence, Caesar is not your average ape.

It was all too easy to assume that Rise of the Planet of the Apes was set to be an average summer movie – a rehash of the franchise that, while good, was never going to be groundbreaking stuff. But oh how wrong that was. Continue reading

Kings

There is absolutely no doubt about it.

These two are reigning right now.

What I’m Watching – August

This list only includes films I watched for the first time this month. My most recent viewing is the top entry:

Limitless (Dir: Neil Burger, 2011) ****

The Inbetweeners Movie (Dir: Ben Palmer, 2011) ****

Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes (Dir: Rupert Wyatt, 2011) ****

The Skin I Live In (Dir: Pedro Almodovar, 2011) ****

Lars And The Real Girl (Dir: Craig Gillespie, 2007) ****

Into The Wild (Dir: Sean Penn, 2007) *****

The Kids Are All Right (Dir: Lisa Cholodenko, 2010) ****

Half Nelson (Dir: Ryan Fleck, 2006) ****

Cowboys & Aliens (Dir: Jon Favreau, 2011) **

Drive (Dir: Nicolas Winding Refn, 2011) *****

Warrior (Dir: Gavin O’Connor, 2011) *****

Moon (Dir: Duncan Jones, 2009) *****

Review: Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

DIRECTOR: Joe Johnston.

CAST: Chris Evans, Hayley Atwell, Sebastian Stan, Tommy Lee Jones, Hugo Weaving, Dominic Cooper, Stanley Tucci, Toby Jones, Richard Armitage, Neal McDonough, Derek Luke, Kenneth Choi, JJ Feild, Lex Shrapnel, Samuel L. Jackson.

SYNOPSIS: With World War II forcing America into action, Steve Rogers (Evans) is desperate to be drafted for military service. Sickly and rather on the small side, he receives knock back after knock back until his path crosses Dr. Erskine (Tucci) who is recruiting for the very hushed Project Rebirth. Being accepted due to his incredible courage, his body is enhanced to its maximum potential and Captain America is born. However, Johann Schmidt (Weaving) has plans to use the same technology to progress the Nazi’s secret organisation, HYDRA.

Holy smokes. Joe Johnston’s made something that’s more than just a ‘good’ film. In fact, he’s made a bloody great film that can easily boast of standing alongside Marvel’s best. Captain America is one of those rare comic book adaptations that has more on offer than just a glossy surface. It lacks an overly camp villain, manages to avoid glaringly cheesy one-liners from its star and has a female love interest who has more than a couple of brain cells (and who earns extra brownie points for being a Brit). The ending is one that will more than satisfy the Marvel diehards, but will undoubtedly confuse the hell out of those who have merely popped along to see that-film-that’s-going-to-shove-American-patriotism-down-my-throat – which it surprisingly doesn’t, actually. Of course, you’re not a real Marvel fan unless you stay until the end of the credits and this time the payoff is unbelievably sweet. Continue reading